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Inside Our Church

Our church on Bridge Street is very beautiful.    On entering, over the central doorway are three icons:  Our Lord seated in glory, Our Lady and John the Baptist.     These were commissioned by our late Prior Fr. Jim Harris O.P. and painted by Romanian artist and iconographer Mihai Cucu.

The central aisle is flanked by twelve pillars.   The ornamental capitals at the top of each and the statues above them, statues of Dominican saints were sculpted by Dublin stonemason James Pearse, the father of the 1916 patriots Padraig and William.

At the end of the aisle on the left is the shrine of St. Martin de Porres O.P.   The altar at the top of this aisle is dedicated to St. Joseph.   The fresco was painted by the Irish Dominican Fr. Aengus Buckley O.P.    It shows St. Joseph  surrounded by four angels.    Fr. Buckley got four local girls, three of whom are still alive, to sit as models for the angels.

On the right side of the church at  the back is a shrine to St. Dominic, opened to mark 800 years of the Dominicans, the Order of Preachers,  and towards the top of the aisle is a shrine to Padre Pio, to which there is great devotion.   The beautiful altar at the top is for Our Lady of the Rosary.   The statue depicts Our Lady giving the rosary to St. Dominic and St. Catherine of Siena.    Two fine mosaics show the Nativity and the Coronation of Our Lady.    Above these we see angels.

The original high altar has been preserved.     The marble statue of the Sacred Heart that was over it can now be seen on the quay, near the clock tower, where it was placed as a monument to the Patriot Dead of Ireland.    Around the altar are seven mosaic panels.    The three central ones show the transfigured Christ with Peter, James and John and above them Moses and Elijah.    The four side panels are of local interest.    First, on the left is St. Otteran baptising a Viking chief.    He is shown standing in front of Reginald’s Tower but St. Otteran never set foot in Waterford.    It was the Vikings who had great devotion to him and this was adopted by the locals, so much so that Otteran is now a Patron Saint of the diocese of Waterford and Lismore.     Next is St. Declan of Ardmore and behind him is the Cathedral on Barronstrand  street.

The original cartoons for the design of these mosaics were drawn by an Irish Dominican Fr. John Heuston O.P. brother of Sean Heuston , another 1916 patriot.  Across to the standing Dominican friar.    This is Fr, Geoffrey, one of the first Dominicans in Waterford.    He was a noted scholar, especially of languages,  who translated the bible and other sacred writings into Arabic and other languages.    The seated figure in a lay brother’s habit is thought to be Fr. John Heuston who often included himself in his works.   The church behind them is this church, St. Saviours.     Finally there is Our Lady of Waterford guarding the city along with her religious troops.    The forbidding chap below on the horse is Oliver Cromwell – yes ! – a picture of Cromwell in a Catholic church in Ireland !    Between Our Lady and Cromwell appears the crest of Waterford with the motto ‘Urbs Intacta Manet’ – ‘the city remains untaken’.     This motto was given to Waterford by an English king, Henry VII in 1497, centuries before Cromwell was born.    It was granted to the noble citizens of Waterford who had kept the city for the English King safe from the rebellious Irish who tried to take it.    Here Fr. Heuston uses it as a snub to Cromwell who laid siege to Waterford  for nine months but failed to break in.   Above the mosaics are five frescoes.   These depict the four evangelists and, in the centre, the Holy Spirit.

Feel free to walk up behind the altar to view the mosaics.

 

Dominicans in Waterford

The  Dominican Order was founded in 1216,  eight hundred years ago, to combat heresy which was rife in Europe at the time.   St. Dominic gathered a small group of men around him to pray, to study and to preach the Gospel to the people.   At that time this was most unusual as only Bishops were allowed to preach.   Ordinary priests were not permitted to do so.    When the people saw these first Dominicans preaching openly in public they were amazed.   They became popularly known as Friars (Brothers) Preachers.

The Dominicans arrived in Ireland in 1214 making two foundations, one at Dublin and the other in Drogheda.    The following year they opened a third house, the famous Black Abbey in Kilkenny.   Then they pushed on southwards and came here to Waterford in 1226.

But for all the hurry with which they came to Waterford it took nine years before they found a permanent home.   Then they were given permission and a site on which they built a church and priory at Blackfriars, just inside the old city walls.

 The ruins of the chapel and tower can still be seen off Conduit Lane.  

There followed centuries of persecution and suppression during which the Dominicans were driven out of Waterford many times,  but they always returned.

At a large public meeting in 1873  one of the priests made an impassioned plea “that the people of Waterford in the 19th century would do what their forefathers did in the 13th century:  build for the children of St. Dominic a church that will be worthy of Waterford and a suitable temple to Almighty God “.   The generosity of the response was spectacular.    Work on the new church began in 1874  and it was opened for public worship in late 1876.   The following year the church was consecrated on 2nd, December 1877 by Bishop John Power assisted by Bishop Thomas Croke of Cashel ( who gave his name to Croke Park ) and William Fitzgerald, Bishop of Ross.  

Further improvements and additions came later to give us the church we have today, the Dominicans, Bridge Street, Waterford.

 

 

Padre Pio Shrine

There is now a new shrine to Saint Padre Pio in the church.     It is to be found in Our Lady’s aisle. 

 

 

 

 

Our Lady of Waterford

Our  Lady of  Waterford

This beautiful little statue can be found in St Saviours church on Bridge Street in Waterford.     It is located on the right hand side ( as you enter ) just outside the altar rails. The title Our Lady of Waterford is appropriate as the statue has helped generations of Waterford people in their devotion to the Mother of God.

The Dominicans first came to Waterford in 1226 and it is believed the statue held a place of honour in the original Dominican Priory situated on Blackfriars Street.   When the last Prior, William Martin surrendered the priory to Henry VIII the site contained a chapel called   ‘ Our Lady’s chapel ‘ and it is possible the statue was procured for that Chapel.

It is made of wood lightly painted.    It was made on the continent of Europe but it’s date of origin is uncertain.

Dispossession and persecution failed to dim the devotion of the people of Waterford to the Mother of God.     Without the shelter of a priory or chapel the statue some how survived the persecution.    One of the Dominican friars wrapped it carefully, applied three coats of paint and then encased the whole lot in a large brick.    Miraculously, when the danger had passed,  it was discovered, excavated  from the block, unwrapped and cleaned.

In 1815 with the death of Fr. Anthony Duane it seemed as if the Dominican presence in Waterford had come to an end.    The statue was removed to the Dominican Black Abbey in Kilkenny and later it was taken to Limerick.    Invited back by Bishop O’Brien in 1865 the Dominicans resumed their apostolate in Waterford.    In 1867 they opened an oratory in Bridge Street and in May 1876 the present church was opened for public worship.    The statue of Our Lady of Waterford was returned from Limerick and has remained in this church ever since.

In gratitude for the many favours received the people of Waterford commissioned Messrs.  Egan of Cork to make two gold crowns and a sceptre for the statue.    These were placed on the statue in a ceremony in 1934 in front of a large congregation.

This statue has been removed for renovation and for its protection during the work on the church.

Our Lady of Waterford protect us.

Padre Pio – Bilocation

 

Bilocation means being in two different places at the same time.    That’s impossible for us to do – we can only be in one place at any given time.    But so many were the calls on Padre Pio for his help that he was blessed with this ability.   He could be in  two different places at once.    It was a gift that was given to him by God.

Often he appeared to people who had never seen him before but who had sought his help in their hour of need.   He appeared to people all over Italy and even in foreign countries far distant from there.    He hurried to the bedside of the sick who asked for his presence and his care.

Father Fernando writes  ” One day in 1922 the friars of San Giovanni Rotondo were talking about the bilocation of Saint Anthony of Padua as it was close to his feast day.    One young friar observed that perhaps those so privileged were not aware of their bilocation.    Padre Pio with the assurance of an expert answered   ” Of course they know.    They might not know whether it’s their body or their soul that moves but they are fully aware of what is taking place and where they are going “.

In 1956 one of the community Father Francesco Napolitano had just returned from the United States.     In the refectory when the friars were at meals he often spoke about his trip and especially about New York.    Padre Pio always enjoyed listening to him.   Once he asked Padre Pio  ” Have you ever been to New York Padre ?”     Without thinking he replied  ” Oh yes.    You have been there once.    I’ve been there hundreds of times “.     Then Father Eusebio came up with a question   ” When you are in America what language do you speak ?”    Padre Pio replied brusquely  ” Italian  of course.    How many miracles do you expect the Lord to work for me ?”

On another occasion when he was presented with some pilgrims who asked for his prayers one lady spoke up.    ” Father I call on you constantly.     I keep inviting you but you never come “.      ” Yes ” replied Padre Pio  ” do you think I am deaf ?     You have exasperated me with your constant little complaints.    It would be better if you had a little faith in God “.

On the feast of Corpus Christi, June 12th, 1952 Lucia Bellodi was lying on her death bed.

When she was fourteen years of age Lucia developed serious diabetes. As she grew older her diabetes got worse. Her stomach became very swollen and she had an insatiable thirst. She used to drink about fifty pints of water every day.

Then on the feast of Corpus Christi she stopped drinking water and asked to be taken to the chapel.   While there she drank no water and even refused it when offered to her.   Suddenly she opened her eyes, sat up in bed and began waving her arms as if she were overcome by joy.    She cried out   ” Padre Pio told me I am cured.   He told me to get up and to come at once to his monastery because he wanted to bless me and praise God with me.”    She was completely cured.

Later she visited San Giovanni Rotondo and met Padre Pio.   He smiled at her, blessed her and said “I have been waiting for you”.

In World War II  an Italian regiment was being fiercely shelled by the Allies, one of the Italian soldiers had taken cover behind a large rock.   Suddenly a “monk” as he called him stood next to him and told him to get out from behind the rock.    The soldier refused until eventually the monk caught him by the arm and physically dragged him away.    At that very moment a shell exploded where they had stood and devastated the whole area.    The soldier was safe.    The monk had disappeared.

A few days later the soldier told a friend what had happened.     The friend showed him a picture of Padre Pio which he had with him.    ” That’s the monk who saved my life ”  the soldier exclaimed.    He had never seen or heard of Padre Pio before that.

The  Capuchin superior wrote    ” An elderly lady in America contracted cancer and could not be cured.     She would die.     One day a friend gave her a picture of Padre Pio and said ‘ This friar can cure you ‘.    The lady had never even heard of Padre Pio.    Then one night he appeared to her and asked her to become a Catholic and he assured her that she would be cured.    Later the woman called a priest and after a long period of instruction she was baptised and became a Catholic.    She was cured of her cancer and afterwards lived a normal life.

On another occasion Padre Pio was seen in the Vatican kneeling and praying at the tomb of Pope Saint Pius X.

In Uruguay in South America Monsignor Damiani was vicar general of the diocese.    On one of his frequent visits to Padre Pio he asked him to promise that he would assist him at the hour of his death.    One night in 1941 the Archbishop Barbieri was awakened by a knock on his bedroom door.    In the shadows he saw a Capuchin priest who said to him  ” Go and help Monsignor Damiani,  he is dying “.     He got up and hurried to the dying man’s bedside.    Father Navarro administered the last rites and a half hour later he died.    Years later Archbishop Barbieri went to San Giovanni Rotondo  and he confirmed that the Capuchin he had seen in the shadows was Padre Pio.

 

 

 

Sunday Reading – 7th July 2013

FIRST READING:              Genesis 22:1-19
(The sacrifice of our father Abraham. In being prepared to sacrifice his son Isaac, Abraham’s faith is tested. He is proved loyal and faithful and is rewarded with the promise of many descendants who will become a great nation.)

It happened some time later that God put Abraham to the test. ‘Abraham, Abraham’ he called. ‘Here I am’ he replied. ‘Take your son,’ God said ‘your only child Isaac, whom you love, and go to the land of Moriah. There you shall offer him as a burnt offering, on a mountain I will point out to you.’

Rising early next morning Abraham saddled his ass and took with him two of his servants and his son Isaac. He chopped food for the burnt offering and started on his journey to the place God had pointed out to him. On the third day Abraham looked up and saw the place in the distance. Then Abraham said to his servants, ‘Stay here with the donkey. The boy and I will go over there; we will worship and come back to you.’

Ab's SACRIFICEAbraham took the wood for the burnt offering, loaded it, on Isaac, and carried in his own hands the fire and the knife. Then the two of them set out together. Isaac spoke to his father Abraham, ‘Father’ he said. ‘Yes, my son’  he replied. ‘Look,’ he said ‘here are the fire and the wood, but where is the lamb for the burnt offering?’ Abraham answered, ‘My son, God himself will provide the lamb for the burnt offering’, Then the two of them went on together.

When they arrived at the place God had pointed out to him, Abraham built an altar there, and arranged the wood. Then he bound his son Isaac and put him on the altar on top of the wood. Abraham stretched out his hand and seized the knife to kill his son.

But the angel of the Lord called to him from heaven. ‘Abraham, Abraham’ he said. ‘I am here’ he replied. ‘Do not raise your hand against the boy’ the angel said. ‘Do not harm him, for now I know you fear God. You have not refused me your son, your only son.’ Then looking up, Abraham saw a ram caught by its horns in a bush. Abraham took the ram and offered it as a burnt-offering in place of his son. Abraham called this place the Lord provides’, and hence the saying today: On the mountain the Lord provides.

The angel of the Lord called Abraham a second time from heaven. ‘I swear by my own self – it is the Lord who speaks – because you have done this, because you have not refused me your son, your only son, I will shower blessings on you, I will make your descendants as many as the stars of heaven and the grains of sand on the seashore. Your descendants shall gain possession of the gates of their enemies. All the nations of the earth shall bless themselves by your descendants, as a reward for your obedience.’

Abraham went back to his servants, and together they set out for Beersheba, and he settled in Beersheba.

Responsorial Psalm :      Ps 114
Response:   
                       I will walk in the presence of the Lord
                                              in the land of the living.
Or:                                        Alleluia!

1. I love the Lord for he has heard
the cry of my appeal;
for he turned his ear to me
in the day when I called him.          Response

2. They surrounded me, the snares of death,
with the anguish of the tomb;
they caught me, sorrow and distress.
I called on the Lord’s name.
O Lord my God, deliver me!             Response

3. How gracious is the Lord, and just;
our God has compassion.
The Lord protects the simple hearts;
I was helpless so he saved me.    Response

4. He has kept my soul from death,
(my eyes from tears)
and my feet from stumbling.
I will walk in the presence of the Lord
in the land of the living.                     Response

Gospel  Acclamation          Jn 14: 6

Alleluia, alleluia!
Blessed are you, Father,
Lord of heaven and earth,
for revealing the mysteries of the kingdom
to mere children.
Alleluia!

or                                              2 Cor 5:19

Alleluia, alleluia!
God in Christ was reconciling the world to himself,
and he has entrusted to us the news that they are reconciled.
Alleluia!

GOSPEL:                             Matthew 9:1-8

Jesus got back in the boat, crossed the water and came to his own town. Then some people appeared, bringing him a paralytic stretched out on a bed. Seeing their faith, Jesus said to the paralytic, ‘Courage, my child, your sins are forgiven’. And at this some scribes said to themselves, ‘This man is blaspheming’. Knowing what was in their minds Jesus said, ‘Why do you have such wicked thoughts in your hearts? Now, which of these is easier to say, “Your sins are forgiven”, or to say, “Get up and walk”? But to prove to you that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins,’ – he said to the paralytic – ‘get up, and pick up your bed and go off home’.

And the man got up and went home. A feeling of awe came over the crowd when they saw this, and they praised God for giving such power to men.

 

Sunday Reading – 23th June 2013

FIRST READING: 2Corinthians 12:1-10

Must I go on boasting, though there is nothing to be gained by it? But I will move on to the visions and revelations I have had from the Lord. I know a man in Christ who, fourteen years ago, was caught up whether still in the body or out of the body, I do not know; God knows-right into the third heaven. I do know, however, that this same person-whether in the body or out of the body, I do not know; God knows- was caught up into paradise and heard things which must not and cannot be put into human language. I will boast about a man like that, but not about anything of my own except my weaknesses. If I should decide to boast, I should not be made to look foolish, because I should only be speaking the truth; but I am not going to, in case anyone should begin to think I am better than he can actually see and hear me to be.

In view of the extraordinary nature of these revelations, to stop me from getting too proud I was given a thorn in the flesh, an angel of Satan to beat me and stop me from getting too proud! About this thing, I have pleaded with the Lord three times for it to leave me, but he has said, ‘My grace is enough for you: my power is at its best in weakness’. So I shall be very happy to make my weaknesses my special boast so that the power of Christ may stay over me, and that is why I am quite content with my weaknesses, and with insults, hardships, persecutions, and the agonies I go through for Christ’s sake. For it is when I am weak that I am strong.

Responsorial Psalm : Ps33
Response : Taste and see that the Lord is good.

1. The angel of the Lord is encamped
around those who revere him, to rescue them.
Taste and see that the Lord is good.
He is happy who seeks refuge in him. Response

2. Revere the Lord, you his saints.
They lack nothing, those who revere him.
Strong lions suffer want and go hungry
but those who seek the Lord lack no blessing. Response

3. Come, children, and hear me
that I may teach you the fear of the Lord.
Who is he who longs for life
and many days, to enjoy his prosperity? Response

Gospel Acclamation Mt 4: 4

Alleluia, alleluia!
Man does not live on bread alone, but on every word
that comes from the mouth of God .
Alleluia!

or 2 Cor 8: 9

Alleluia, alleluia!
Jesus Christ was rich,
but he became poor for your sake,
to make you rich out of his poverty.
Alleluia!

GOSPEL: Matthew 6:24-34

Jesus said to his disciples: ‘No one can be the slave of two masters: he will either hate the first and love the second, or treat the first with respect and the second with scorn. You cannot be the slave both of God and of money.

‘That is why I am telling you not to worry about your life and what you are to eat, nor about your body and how you are to clothe it. Surely life means more than food, and the body more than clothing! Look at the birds in the sky. They do not sow or reap or gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are we not worth much more than they are? Can any of you, for all his worrying, add one single cubit to his span of life? And why worry about clothing? Think of the flowers growing in the fields; they never have to work or spin; yet I assure you that not even Solomon in all his regalia was robed like one of these. Now if that is how God clothes the grass in the field which is there today and thrown into the furnace tomorrow, will he not much more look after you, you men of little faith? So do not worry; do not say, “What are we to eat? What are we to drink? How are we to be clothed?” It is the pagans who set their hearts on all these things. Your heavenly Father knows you need them all. Set your hearts on his kingdom first, and on his righteousness, and all these other things will be given you as well. So do not worry about tomorrow: tomorrow will take care of itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.

Sunday Reading – 16th June 2013

FIRST READING:           2 Samuel 12:7-10.13

Nathan said to David, ‘ The Lord the God of Israel says this, “I anointed you king over Israel; I delivered you from the hands of Saul; I gave your master’s house to you, his wives into your arms; I gave you the House of Israel and of Judah; and if this were not enough, I would add as much again for you. Why have you shown contempt for Yahweh, doing what displeases him? You have struck down Uriah the Hittite with the sword, taken his wife for your own, and killed him with the sword of the Ammonites. So now the sword will never be far from your House, since you have shown contempt for me and taken the wife of Uriah the Hittite to be your wife.”

David said to Nathan, ‘I have sinned against Yahweh’. Then Nathan said to David, ‘Yahweh, for his part, forgives your sin; you are not to die.’

RESPONSORIAL PSALM:   Ps 31
Response :                              Forgive, Lord, the guilt of my sin.

1. Happy the man whose offence is forgiven
whose sin is remitted.
O happy the man to whom the Lord
imputes no guilt,
in whose spirit is no guile. :                          Response

2. But now I have acknowledged my sins:
my guilt I did not hide.
I said: ‘I will confess
my offence to the Lord.’
And you, Lord, have forgiven
the guilt of my sin.                                            Response

3. You are my hiding place, O Lord;
you save me from distress.
You surround me with cries of deliverance. Response

4. Rejoice, rejoice in the Lord,
exult, you just!
O come, ring out your joy,
all you upright of heart.                                   Response

SECOND READING:       Gal 2:16. 19-21

We acknowledge that what makes a man righteous is not obedience to the Law, but faith in Jesus Christ. We had to become believers in Christ Jesus no less than you had, and now we hold that faith in Christ rather than fidelity to the Law is what justifies us, and that no one can be justified by keeping the Law. In other words, through the Law I am dead to the Law, so that now I can live for God. I have been crucified with Christ, and I live now not with my own life but with the life of Christ who lives in me. The life I now live in this body I live in faith: faith in the Son of God who loved me and who sacrificed himself for my sake. I cannot bring myself to give up God’s gift: if the Law can justify us, there is no point in the death of Christ.’

Gospel  Acclamation          Jn 1: 14. 12

Alleluia, alleluia!
I am the Way, the Truth and the Life, says the Lord;
no one can come to the Father except through me.
Alleluia!

Or                                             1Jn 4:10

Alleluia, alleluia!
God’ so loved us when he sent his Son
to be the sacrifice that takes our sins away.
Alleluia!

Gospel:                                   Luke 7:36—8:3

One of the Pharisees invited Jesus to a meal. When he arrived at the Pharisee’s house and took his place at table, a woman came in, who had a bad name in the town. She had heard he was dining with the Pharisee and had brought with her an alabaster jar of ointment. She waited behind him at his feet, weeping, and her tears fell on his feet, and she wiped them away with her hair; then she covered his feet with kisses and anointed them with the ointment.

When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this, he said to himself, ‘If this man were a prophet, he would know who this woman is that is touching him and what a bad name she has.’ Then Jesus took him up and said, ‘Simon, I have something to say to you.’‘Speak Master’ was the reply. ‘There was once a creditor who had two men in. his debt; one owed him five hundred denarii, the other fifty. They were unable to pay, so he pardoned them both. Which of them will love him more?’‘The one who was pardoned more, I suppose’ answered Simon. Jesus said, ‘You are right.’

Then he turned to the woman. ‘Simon’, he said ‘you see this woman? I came into your house, and you poured no water over my feet, but she has poured out her tears over my feet and wiped them away with her hair. You gave me no kiss, but she has been covering my feet with kisses ever since I came in. You did not anoint my head with oil, but she has anointed my feet with ointment. For this reason I tell you that her sins, her many sins, must have been forgiven her, or she would not have shown such great love. It is the man who is forgiven little who shows little love.’ Then he said to her, ‘Your sinS are forgiven.’ Those who were with him at table began to say to themselves, ‘Who is this man, that he even forgives sins?’ But he said to the woman ‘Your faith has saved you; go in peace.’

Now after this he made his way through towns and villages, preaching, and proclaiming the Good News of the kingdom of God. With him went the Twelve, as well as certain women who had been cured of evil spirits and ailments: Mary surnamed the Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out, Joanna the wife of Herod’s steward Chuza, Susanna, and several others who provided for them out of their own resources.

The gospel of the Lord.

0r GOSPEL:                          Luke 7:36-50 (Shorter form)

One of the Pharisees invited Jesus to a meal. When he arrived at the Pharisee’s house and took his place at table, a woman came in, who had a bad name in the town. She had heard he was dining with the Pharisee and had brought with her an alabaster jar of ointment. She waited behind him at his feet, weeping, and her tears fell on his feet, and she wiped them away with her hair; then she covered his feet with kisses and anointed them with the ointment.

When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this, he said to himself, ‘If this man were a prophet, he would know who this woman is that is touching him and what a bad name she has’. Then Jesus took him up and said, ‘Simon, I have something to say to you’. ‘Speak, Master’ was the reply. ‘There was once a creditor who had two men in his debt; one owed him five hundred denarii, the other fifty. They were unable to pay, so he pardoned them both. Which of them will love him more?’ ‘The one who was pardoned more, I suppose’ answered Simon. Jesus said, ‘You are right’.

Then he turned to the woman. ‘Simon,’ he said ‘you see this woman? I came into your house, and you poured no water over my feet, but she has poured out her tears over my feet and wiped them away with her hair. You gave me no kiss, but she has been covering my feet with kisses ever since I came in. You did not anoint my head with oil, but she has anointed my feet with ointment. For this reason I tell you that her sins, her many sins, must have been forgiven her, or she would not have shown such great love. It is the man who is forgiven little who shows little love.’ Then he said to her, ‘Your sins are forgiven’. Those who were with him at table began to say to themselves, ‘Who is this man, that he even forgives sins?’ But he said to the woman, ‘Your faith has saved you; go in peace’.

Sunday Reading – 9th June 2013

FIRST READING: Isaiah 61:9-11


Their race will be famous throughout the nations, their descendants throughout the peoples. All who see them will admit that they are a race whom the Lord has blessed.

 

‘I exult for joy in the Lord, my soul rejoices in my God,

for he has clothed me in the garments of salvation,

he has wrapped me in the cloak of integrity,

like a bridegroom wearing his wreath,

like a bride adorned in her jewels.

‘For as the earth makes fresh things grow,

as a garden makes seeds spring up,

so will the Lord God make both integrity

and praise spring up in the sight of the nations.’

 

PSALM :                1Samuel 2:1

 

GOSPEL:               Luke 2:41-51

Every year his parents used to go to Jerusalem for the feast of the Passover.

 

When he was twelve years old, they went up for the feast as usual. When they were on their way home after the feast, the boy Jesus stayed behind in Jerusalem without his parents knowing it. They assumed he was with the caravan, and it was only after a day’s journey that they went to look for him among their relations and acquaintances. When they failed to find him they went back to Jerusalem looking for him everywhere. Three days later, they found him in the Temple, sitting among the doctors, listening to them, and asking them questions; and all those who heard him were astounded at his intelligence and his replies. They were overcome when they saw him, and his mother said to him, ‘My child, why have, you done this to us? See how worried your father and I have been, looking for you.’ ‘Why were you looking for me?’ he replied ‘Did you not know that I must be busy with my Father’s affairs?’ But they did not understand what he meant.

 

He then went down with them and came to Nazareth and lived under their authority. His mother stored up all these things in her heart.

Sunday Reading – 10th March 2013

First Reading                  Joshua 5:9-12

‘The Lord said to Joshua, ‘Today I have taken the shame of Egypt away from you’.

The Israelites pitched their camp at Gilgal and kept the Passover there on the fourteenth day of the month, at evening in the plain of Jericho. On the morrow of the Passover they tasted the produce of that country, unleavened bread and roasted ears of corn, that same day. From that time, from their first eating of the produce of that country, the manna stopped falling. And having manna no longer, the Israelites fed from that year onwards on what the land of Canaan yielded.

 

Responsorial Psalm        Ps 102
Response:  
                      Taste and see that the Lord is good.

1. I will bless the Lord at all times,
his praise always on my lips;
in the Lord my soul shall make its boast.
The humble shall hear and be glad.       Response

2. Glorify the Lord with me.
Together let us praise his name.
I sought the Lord and he answered me;
from all my terrors he set me free.          Response

3. Look towards him and be radiant;
let your faces not be abashed.
This poor man called; the Lord heard him
and rescued him from all his distress.  Response

Second Reading     2Corinthians 5:17-21

‘For anyone who is in Christ, there is a new creation; the old creation has gone, and now the new one is here. It is all God’s work. It was God who reconciled us to himself through Christ and gave us the work of handing on this reconciliation. In other words, God in Christ was reconciling the world to himself, not holding men’s faults against them, and he has entrusted to us the news that they are reconciled. So we are ambassadors for Christ; it is as though God were appealing through us, and the appeal that we make in Christ’s name is: be reconciled to God. For our sake God made the sinless one into sin, so that in him we might become the goodness of God.
Gospel  Acclamation     Lk 15:18

Praise and honour to you, Lord Jesus!
Man does not live on bread alone
but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.
Praise and honour to you, Lord Jesus!


Gospel    Luke 13:1-9

‘The tax collectors and the sinners, meanwhile, were all seeking his company to hear what he had to say, and the Pharisees and the scribes complained. ‘This man’ they said ‘welcomes sinners and eats with them. So he spoke this parable to them:

‘A man had two sons. The younger said to his father, “Father, let me have the share of the estate that would come to me”. So the father divided the property between them. A few days later, the younger son got together everything he had and left for a distant country where he squandered his money on a life of debauchery.

‘When he had spent it all, that country experienced a severe famine, and now he began to feel the pinch, so he hired himself out to one of the local inhabitants who put him on his farm to feed the pigs. And he would willingly have filled his belly with the husks the pigs were eating but no one offered him anything. Then he came to his senses and said, “How many of my father’s paid servants have more food than they want, and here am I dying of hunger! I will leave is this place and go to my father and say: Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you; I no longer deserve to be called your son; treat me as one of your paid servants.” So he left the place and went back to his father.

‘While he was still a long way off, his father saw him and was moved with pity. He ran to the boy, clasped him in his arms and kissed him tenderly. Then his son said, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. I no longer deserve to be called your son.” But the father said to his servants, “Quick! Bring out the best robe and put it on him; put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. Bring the calf we have been fattening, and kill it; we are going to have a feast, a celebration, because this son of mine was dead and has come back to life; he was lost and is found.” And they began to celebrate.

‘Now the elder son was out in the fields, and on his way back, as he drew near the house, he could hear music and dancing. Calling one of the servants he asked what it was all about. “Your brother has come” replied the servant “and your father has killed the calf we had fattened because he has got him back safe and sound.” He was angry then and refused to go in, and his father came out to plead with him; but he answered his father, “Look, all these years I have slaved for you and never once disobeyed your orders, yet you never offered me so much as a kid for me to celebrate with my friends. But, for this son of yours, when he comes back after swallowing up your property – he and his women – you kill the calf we had been fattening.”

The father said,

“My son, you are with me always and all I have is yours.
But it was only right we should celebrate and rejoice,
because your brother here was dead and has come to life;
he was lost and is found.”‘